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Resilience Research in Adults

Related Books

If you would like to see a complete listing of Dr. Martin E.P. Seligman’s publications, please see his Curriculum Vitae. The letters and numbers preceding the publications below correspond to those in the Vitae.

Seligman, M.E.P.(1990). Learned Optimism. New York: Knopf.
Paperback Edition: Pocket Books (Simon & Schuster), 1991
Audio Edition: Simon & Schuster, 1991
Audio Edition: HarperCollins, 1996

Seligman, M.E.P., Reivich, K., Jaycox, L., and Gillham, J. (1995). The Optimistic Child. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
Paperback edition: HarperCollins, 1996
Audio Edition: HarperCollins, 1996

Related Scientific and Scholarly Publications

Seligman, M.E.P., Schulman, P., DeRubeis, R.J., & Hollon, S.D. (1999). The prevention of depression and anxiety. Prevention and Treatment. Click here to download article.

Buchanan, G.M, Gardenswartz, C.R., & Seligman, M.E.P. (1999). Physical health following a cognitive-behavioral intervention, Prevention and Treatment. Click here to download article.

Seligman, M.E.P., Schulman, P. & Tryon, A. (2007). Group prevention of depression and anxiety symptoms. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 45, 1111-1126. Click here to download article.

 

Abstract from The prevention of depression and anxiety:

A brief and inexpensive cognitive-behavioral prevention program was given to university students at risk for depression. "At risk" was defined as being in the most pessimistic quarter of explanatory style. 231 students were randomized into either an 8-week prevention workshop that met in groups of 10, once per week for 2 hours, or into an assessment-only control group. Subjects were followed for 3 years and we report the preventive effects of the workshop on depression and anxiety. First, the workshop group had significantly fewer episodes of generalized anxiety disorder than the control group and showed a trend toward fewer major depressive episodes. The workshop group had significantly fewer moderate depressive episodes but no fewer severe depressive episodes. Second, the workshop group had significantly fewer depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms than the control group, as measured by self-report but not by clinicians' ratings. Third, the workshop group had significantly greater improvements in explanatory style, hopelessness, and dysfunctional attitudes than the control group and these were significant mediators of depressive symptom prevention in the workshop group.